Water Damaged Cars May Flood Local Dealerships Following Severe Weather

Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) May 19, 2011

Leadsbyfone is a marketing and lead generation company servicing the water damage and basement flooding cleanup industry. This release is for informational purposes only, Water Damage Local does not repair water damaged vehicles.

Rena Michelle of Little Rock, AR thought she had found the dream car, a slightly used, 2010 Chevy Impala, the perfect choice for her and her three children. She did the ubiquitous test drive and walk around so far, it looked good. Then, following the advice of her neighbor, she took the car to a local mechanic to have it checked out, a decision she is now very glad she made as the car had water damage.

A more thorough inspection of the perfect car turned up rust where there shouldnt be, especially in a car so new, as well as moisture stains in the carpeting and visible water lines in the engine compartment and trunk. Digging into the vehicles title history revealed the culprit.the car had been caught up in some local area flooding months before, suffering major water damage and requiring considerable repair to correct. The decision to have a pre-purchase inspection performed saved Ms. Michelle thousands of dollars in near future repairs and improvements.

Rena Michelle is one case, however with the recent record flooding across much of the southeastern US, its a sure bet that many cars just like this one will be cropping up on dealership lots. While dealers are required by law to disclose if a car has had previous damage, the fact is that unscrupulous dealers are as plentiful in the automotive world as fleas on a dog, and just about as annoying.

These bottom feeders of the industry know that a car can be repaired, appear as good as new, and be sold for an attractive profit as the result of buying the vehicle initially as a low cost salvage title. The result is a classic case of buyer beware when shopping for your next automobile.

Dont become the secondary victim of somebody elses misfortune. Once a good vehicle is found, ask questions. Hard ones. Make sure the auto dealer is open with the vehicle’s history. Dont be afraid to crawl all over it, or through it, or under it, or whatever it takes. Drive the car more than once. Look for signs that the vehicle has a questionable history, such as water in the intake, stains under the spare tire, or grass and mud under the hood (if that alone doesn’t reveal something is amiss, nothing will).

And even if the car appears okay on all counts, just when the dealer thinks he has sold it, postpone buying it until a trusted mechanic gives it a thorough inspection and his approval. Legitimate dealers will have no problem with this. However, if the dealer hesitates, get up, walk out, and dont look back. It just became obvious that he has something to hide.

Follow these common sense rules to avoid getting stuck with a flooded out lemon.

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